Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

Carrying a postmark from November 1909, this vintage postcard features Santa Claus with snow falling around him, holding a sign that reads A Jolly / old Fashioned / Christmas / to you / and to me / if you get my / shirt. That last part was added by the sender of the card. In …

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As we arrive closer to the end of this wonderful little album of gem tintypes, we find two spectacular examples of gentlemen’s top hats. The top left image has the distinct sheen of silk on that hat. It is glossy and impressive. Note the fine tinting of his cheeks to give a more “lifelike” appearance …

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A. B. Cross Photo, Salem MA Alva Pearsall Photographer, Brooklyn, NY Turner, Boston MA L. W. Cook, Boston, MA Glines, The Fotografer, Boston MA G. A. Underwood, Worcester, MA These are a selection of unidentified photographs in my collection. They do look like the faces of a ship’s crew to some degree. The two fellows …

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This photo of a mature couple features a long beard and an Edwardian styled dress. This dates the photo to after 1904. The lady’s hair is also more softly styled, an influence of the Gibson Girl style so popular around the turn of the century. The photographer was probably G. C. Bauman in Burlington, IA. …

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  This type of mustache is what I would term a “walrus” in that it covers the upper lip in a healthy fashion and extends past the sides of the lips a bit. Other than the generous ‘stache, this fellow has close cropped hair and a receding hairline giving him quite a lot of forehead. …

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  This gentleman is showing off some fine, white side burns, while leaving the area around his mouth clean shaven. It may be an illusion, but it looks a bit like his hair comes off his forehead in a “kewpie doll” style. Do you see that too? The photograph can be dated to the 1890s, …

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Today’s photo from the Leather CdV Album is a fine image of a young man posed quite attractively, presumably so he could impress the ladies he visited and thereby left his visiting card. The square corners of the card indicate the 1860s but this is mid to late century (my guesstimate) due to the entire …

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