Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

As we arrive closer to the end of this wonderful little album of gem tintypes, we find two spectacular examples of gentlemen’s top hats. The top left image has the distinct sheen of silk on that hat. It is glossy and impressive. Note the fine tinting of his cheeks to give a more “lifelike” appearance …

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A youngish fellow, a boater, a bowler and a repeat grace this page with delightful details! Note the wonderfully large bowties on the top two gentlemen. They are almost absurd in their size. The ties must be a good 2″ wide to achieve such a dominating bow. While I’m not well versed in the history …

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Here’s the next page in our bowler hat extravaganza, with three more wonderful hats. Or are they new? The bottom left image is a repeat from a┬áprevious page with the high bowler hat. The top left and lower right look like the same person at first glance, but are two distinct faces. I imagine if …

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Not a hat to be seen in this page of the Haberdasher’s book, but there are some nice bowties at least. Note how the top right image is so dark. I can only assume it was due to poor finishing by the photographer and the image has oxidized and faded with time. The fellow at …

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At first glance, this CDV dated to the 1860s looks like a rather benign fellow with fluffy hair and a frock coat. Perhaps he has an intense gaze, but otherwise, he’s somewhat average. Until you look closely at his eyes. This is one of the few examples I have of the photographer having painted on …

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Two young men, one younger than the other, share this page in our Red Gem album. It is unfortunate that these gems seem to tend toward off center, because I’d like to see the whole person. This young man, maybe an early teenager, has nicely slicked hair and a tidy suit. His bow tie is …

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Inside the Liberty Bell album, I found the 4×6 page of historical information behind one of the photos. The album must have been made after 1895 as it references that year in the information. Having just visited the Liberty Bell in December 2013, this is particularly intriguing information to me. The park ranger leading our …

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