Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

As we arrive closer to the end of this wonderful little album of gem tintypes, we find two spectacular examples of gentlemen’s top hats. The top left image has the distinct sheen of silk on that hat. It is glossy and impressive. Note the fine tinting of his cheeks to give a more “lifelike” appearance …

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This tintype photograph looks remarkably like the fellow we saw back before the holidays, who had his portrait done by T. M. Saurman. The resemblance is strong, so it’s either the same man or his brother. This photograph features some hand tinting on the bowtie, making it pink. The backmark shows that this image was …

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Today we have two very different hats – a man’s slouch and a woman’s pill box. Let’s take a closer look. I’m reminded of a bit of whimsy, the nursery rhyme dated back the King Charles I of England (1600-1649), but only because this dude’s picture is crooked in the book. There was a crooked …

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I do so love this photo! The carefully coiffed hair, the mustache, the slightly crooked bow tie, and the oversized overcoat all come together for a terrific image of a dandy fellow. The image appears to have been made in the late 1890s or very early 1900s, based on the card type, image size and …

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Our next image from the Liberty Bell album shows a mustachioed man with trimmed lapels and a vest, whose photograph is unfortunately faded around the head. While he is disappearing into the background of his photograph, he likely was not a wallflower in real life. His eyes bespeak a man of intensity. His chosen photographer …

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The back of this photograph was inscribed W. R. Austin in pencil, presumably identifying our subject as said person. The mustache featured here today is in the style of George Armstrong Custer, famous Civil War general and infamous Indian fighter. The photographers were Taylor & Preston, known to be in business between 1879-1883 at least. …

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