Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

A nice tintype of an older lady, maybe in her 50s? I have heard a lot of talk lately about tintypes adding years to a person’s face, so unless I see actual age signs, I’m a bit hesitant to guess. However, this lady does have the drooping eyelids and softly falling jowls of middle age. …

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This page of our Red Gem album shows two ladies on the younger side of life. Their hair styles are definitely early 1870s. Here the hair has been gathered in the back, has sausage curled ringlets on one side, and a fluff on the top. The combination of elements is interesting, plus she has something …

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One lady looking superior, one young woman looking disgruntled. Such is life when arranging your hair for the photographer. In order to show off her perfect sausage curls, this lady has her head tilted in a 3/4 profile. Unfortunately, this gives us the “side glance” from her, and she looks a bit snooty, doesn’t she? …

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Today let’s start our dive into Victorian Gems. This is the first page as you open theĀ little Red Gem Album. It’s a nice way to start an album, with two pretty children. It is unfortunate that the scratch goes right across her face but otherwise this image is lovely and well preserved. She has her …

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This gentleman has a rather inquisitive look, doesn’t he? The photograph made by E. W. Smart in Exeter, NH is from post 1900, due to the longer shape of the bristol board and fancy embossed border around the image. We have seen several others from the Liberty Bell album that feature similar styling. According to …

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As we continue through the Liberty Bell album it appears the family and/or friends must have been located in the Massachusetts and New Hampshire area. Today we look at a sullen looking boy in skirts, so under the age of 5, and likely under the age of 4. He is probably upset because he is …

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Here is another W. P. Tilton photograph from the Liberty Bell album. This hat is certainly quite a creation! The Edwardian hats were designed to counterbalance the rounded bosom and protruding derriere that were popular at the time. A good hat could draw the eye up toward the face of the wearer, while the clothing …

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