Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

Page number 6 of this little Haberdasher’s album has two images missing. I have no idea why, it came to me this way. And instead of all men, we buck the trend with a duo of the feminine persuasion in place of a fellow. I like the subtle smiles on their faces. Note that the …

Continue reading

This page of our Red Gem album shows two ladies on the younger side of life. Their hair styles are definitely early 1870s. Here the hair has been gathered in the back, has sausage curled ringlets on one side, and a fluff on the top. The combination of elements is interesting, plus she has something …

Continue reading

As site visitor Auntie Kat pointed out on my previous post – Toothsome – she could see herself wearing the hat pictured….apparently, these two women saw the same potential in this hat! If you look at this photo, and then look back at the previous photo, you will see these two women are wearing the …

Continue reading

Back in the day, the word “toothsome” was used similarly to the word “attractive.” According to the Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, it means agreeable, attractive, sexually attractive, or tasty as relates to food. Apparently, the word originated as describing something pleasing to taste, much like “sweet tooth,” in the 1400s. It was quickly extended to the language …

Continue reading

Sorry for my absence, I hadn’t realized it had been so long since I posted last! Yikes, it is funny how time gets away from us so quickly. Today, let’s look at these two young women. I have heard recently that the early photographic techniques tended to add age to the faces of the subjects …

Continue reading

Today’s image reminds me of a country song, “she used to tie her hair up in ribbons and bows, sign her letters with x’s and o’s.” The young ladies here have put on their Sunday best to have their images struck. This beauty has her hair dressed and covered with a hair net, I believe. …

Continue reading

It can be frustrating as a collector of photographs and antique albums to find that images have gone askew and crooked over the years. I hesitate to touch them as I don’t want to damage the delicate surfaces of tintypes or CDVs. I don’t want to take images out of their photo sleeves unless they …

Continue reading