Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

  Today’s entry for the Mearns Family Album is a collodion print of a gentleman with a fancy mustache and the slightest fringe of beard under his mouth. It’s strange. He has classic facial features and a regular appearance, but that odd beard makes me think there was something wrong under his mouth that he …

Continue reading

For our latest addition to the Mearns Family Album we have this fellow in what I think of as a stylish suit. Although I have commented that men’s fashions are nearly unchangeable through the second half of the 19th century, that is not actually true. Thankfully for you guys! At some point – again I …

Continue reading

This photograph from the Mearns Family Album is unidentified, but comes from the area of our previous photo. As Iggy pointed out, Columbia City and Fort Wayne are close by to each other. My guess is this is a relation to the lady yesterday, probably her husband? He has an unfortunate combover but quite an …

Continue reading

  Based on where this cabinet card was made, Ft Wayne, Indiana, I suspect this is a Clugston family member. The photo is not identified in the Mearns Family Album, but our fabulous Intense Guy discovered that the Clugstons moved out to Indiana some time between the 1850 and 1860 census. The head of the …

Continue reading

Site visitor Intense Guy lives near where our latest family lived and died, and recently visited two cemeteries seeking their final resting places. His story is a testament to genealogy and how powerful these old photographs can be for later generations. Read on, courtesy of Iggy: I drove to the old Zion Presbyterian Church were …

Continue reading

This photograph of an older woman is placed directly over a duplicate of our earlier photo of William T. Mearns. The two subjects appear to be around the same age so I do wonder if this is Mrs. William Mearns, possibly Amy Mearns? The previous photos of Amy Lair and Mary Lair are on the …

Continue reading

Here we have a photo identified as Mary Lair (or possibly Lain or Sain), who was the granddaughter of Amy Lair / Lain / Sain. This photo was made using the collodion process, which dates it after 1894. Additionally, the cardstock used is the white and embossed card that evolved into the type of mounts …

Continue reading