Who Were They?

Lost and forgotten photos from the past

Today we have two very different hats – a man’s slouch and a woman’s pill box. Let’s take a closer look. I’m reminded of a bit of whimsy, the nursery rhyme dated back the King Charles I of England (1600-1649), but only because this dude’s picture is crooked in the book. There was a crooked …

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Back in the day, the word “toothsome” was used similarly to the word “attractive.” According to the Mirriam-Webster Dictionary, it means agreeable, attractive, sexually attractive, or tasty as relates to food. Apparently, the word originated as describing something pleasing to taste, much like “sweet tooth,” in the 1400s. It was quickly extended to the language …

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Here we have two women from the later 1860s or early 1870s. We can tell this by their hair styles and collar styles. Let’s take a closer look. First up, this lady has her hair styled in finger waves before being pulled to the back of her head. The dominant style for hair in the …

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In an unidentified album I sometimes give the photo subjects names, just for my own entertainment. I name the women traditional names, like Susana and Jane, Martha and Mary. Men I have fun with because men’s traditional names are so very different from our modern names. Herman, Harold, Josephus, Isaiah, Eustace….all great, traditional names. All …

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The image on the left side of the page shows two women in a comfortable pose. One is seated while the other rests her arm on the first woman’s shoulder. Their clothing is typical 1860s styling. The woman standing is wearing fashionable style that might have been made to look like two layers. Or, it …

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I have posted in the past photographs that were obviously hand tinted – a black & white photo that was painstakingly painted to look colored. Hand tinting was an art form in and of itself, and was very popular in Asia, Japan in particular. The photo above originally looked like a hand tinted image. Now …

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